Luke 11:2

Luke 11:2 [Textus Receptus (Elzevir) (1624)]240-241
Εἶπε δὲ αὐτοῖς· Ὅταν προσεύχησθε, λέγετε· ΠΆΤΕΡ ἡμῶν ὁ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοις, ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου· ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου· γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου, ὡς ἐν οὐρανῳ, καὶ ἐπὶ τὴς γὴς.

MSS: ℓ339 (f97rc2)

Luke 11:2 [Codex Sinaiticus (א or 01) (4th century)]q78f5vc4
Ειπεν δε αυτοις οταν προσευχησθε λεγετε · πατερ αγιασθητω το ονομα σου · ελθατω η βασιλια σου · γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουρανω ο·υ·τ·ω· και επι ┬ γης

┬ της
*  και ρυσαι ημας απο του πονηρου

Luke 11:2 [Codex Alexandrinus (A02) (5th century)]30rc1
Ειπεν δε αυτοις· οταν προσευχησθε· λεγετε· περ ημων ο εν τοις ουνοις αγιασθητω το ονομα σου· ελθετω η βασιλεια σου· γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουνω και επι γης·

Luke 11:2 [Codex Vaticanus Gr. 1209 (B03) (4th century)]48ac2-3
Ειπεν δε αυτοις οταν προσευχησθε λεγετε πατερ αγιασθητω το ονομα σου ελθετω η βασιλεια σου

Luke 11:2 [Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis (D05) (5th century)]230v|441
Ο δε ειπεν οταν προσευχησθε μη βαττολογειτε ως οι λοιποι δοκουσιν γαρ τινες οτι εν τη πολυλογεια αυτων εισακουσθησονται αλλα προσευχομενοι λεγετε πατερ ημων ο εν τοις ουρανοις αγιασθητω ονομα σου εφ ημας ελθετω σου η βασιλεια γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουρανω και επι γης

Critical Apparatus :

(1) ειπε δε αυτοις : ℓ339, Majority
(2) ειπεν δε αυτοις : א, A, B
(3) ο δε ειπεν : D

(4) προσευχησθε : א, A, B, ℓ339, Majority
(5) ADD μη βαττολογειτε ως οι λοιποι δοκουσιν γαρ τινες οτι εν τη πολυλογεια αυτων εισακουσθησονται αλλα προσευχομενοι : D

(6) ημων ο εν τοις ουρανοις : A, D, ℓ339, Majority
(7) OMIT ημων ο εν τοις ουρανοις : א, B

(8) το ονομα σου : א, A, B, ℓ339, Majority
(9) ονομα σου εφ ημας : D

(10) ελθετω : A, B, D, ℓ339, Majority
(11) ελθατω : א

(12) η βασιλεια σου : A, B, ℓ339, Majority
(13) η βασιλια σου : א
(14) σου η βασιλεια : D

(15) γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουρανω και επι της γης : א2, ℓ339, Majority
(16) γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουρανω και επι γης : א1, A, D
(17) γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουρανω ουτω και επι γης : א*
(18) OMIT γενηθητω το θελημα σου ως εν ουρανω και επι της γης : B

 

 

A Textual Commentary On Luke 11:2

(a) Luke xi. 2, etc. * The form in which the Lord’s Prayer is given in the most ancient authorities in St. Luke’s Gospel is much shorter than in the common text, which agrees far more with St. Matthew. The parts in which the variations occur stand thus seriatim :-
πάτερ ἡμῶν : ἡμῶν is omitted by the Vulg., by Origen, by Tertullian, with B, 1, 33 (ut vid.), and a few others.

ὁ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοις. om. by the Vulg., Arm., by Origen, by Tertullian, with B L, 1, and a few others.

γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου, ὡς ἐν οὐρανῳ, καὶ ἐπὶ τὴς γὴς· om. Vulg., and some other Latin copies, the Curetonian Syriac, Arm., Origen expressly, Tert., Jerome , Augustine expressly, with B L, 1, and a few other copies.

(ver. 4.) ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ· : om. Vulg., Arm., Origen expressly, Tert., Jerome, Augustine expressly ; with B L, 1, and a few other copies.

This passage is a good illustration of the kind of agreement which is often found between a few MSS. and readings which are proved to be ancient by express testimony, such as that of Origen.

* It has been said that the Lord’s Prayer, both in Matthew and Luke, has been an especial object of attack by textual critics. The charge comes to this, that the doxology in Matthew is omitted by critical editors, because it is attested that it is an addition, and so in Luke it is matter of evidence, not opinion, that it has been enlarged out of Matthew,

(S. P. Tregelles, An Account of the Printed Text of the Greek New Testament, pp. 142-143)

(b) D. CODEX BEZAE CANTABRIGIENSIS, inferior to the foregoing in age, compass, and repute, but perhaps surpassing all of them in importance, by reason of its unique character. The manuscript was presented to the University of Cambridge in 1581 by Calvin’s friend Theodore Beza, ” ut inter vere christianas antiquissimae plurimisque nominibus celeberrimae.” It is not earlier than the beginning of the sixth century, but is of peculiar importance as the oldest of the Greek-Latin manuscripts of the Bible. It now contains, with certain lacunae, the Gospels (in the order Matthew, John, Luke, Mark), the concluding verses of the Latin text of 3 John, followed immedi- ately by the Acts, showing that in this manuscript the Epistle of Jude either stood somewhere else or was absent altogether. At least nine later hands can be distinguished in it. The first scribe was more familiar with Latin than Greek, and therefore inserts a Roman letter here and there in the middle of a Greek- word, and has frequently to use the sponge to wash out the mistakes he makes in writing his manuscript. 1 Innumerable passages occur, particularly in Luke and Acts, where the text of D differs in the most remarkable manner from that of all the Greek manuscripts we are acquainted with. It alone, e.g., contains after Luke vi. 4 the incident of the man working in the field on the Sabbath day, to whom Jesus said, “O Man, if thou knowest what thou doest, blessed art thou, but if thou knowest not, thou art cursed and a transgressor of the Law.” It is the only one also that has the words in Luke xi. 2, “when ye pray,use not vain repetitions as the λοιποι.” In Luke xxiii. 53, it says that the stone before the grave of Jesus was of such a size ον μογις εικοσι εκυλιον, an addition in which it has the support of only one Latin MS. and the Sahidic Version. Again in Acts xii. 10, it is alone in recording that there were seven steps down from the prison in Jerusalem (κατεβησαν τους επτα βαθμους).

1 E.g. ΑΠΕCΤΑΛΚΕΝ 122b, 4.

(Eberhard Nestle, Introduction to the Textual Criticism of the Greek New Testament, p. 64)

 

 

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